approaching therapy

musings as they come, and as they evolve …

Alain de Botton

without comments

Loved Krista Tippett’s interview with Alain de Botton.

See https://onbeing.org/programs/alain-de-botton-the-true-hard-work-of-love-and-relationships/

Choice excerpts, relating to themes of expectations, and the reality of how challenging it is for people (crazy as we all are, in our own ways) to get along:

. . . . .

My view of what one should talk about on a first date is not showing off and not putting forward one’s accomplishments, but almost quite the opposite. One should say, “Well, how are you crazy? I’m crazy like this.”

. . . . .

If we start by accepting that of course we’re only just holding it together, and in many ways, really quite challenging people — I think if somebody thinks that they’re easy to live with, they’re by definition going to be pretty hard and don’t have much of an understanding of themselves. I think there’s a certain wisdom that begins by knowing that of course you, like everyone else, is pretty difficult. And this knowledge is very shielded from us. Our parents don’t tell us, our ex-lovers — they knew it, but they couldn’t be bothered to tell us.

. . . . .

I think getting into a relationship with someone, asking someone to be with you is a pretty cruel thing to do to someone that you love and admire and respect because the job is so hard. Most people fail at it.

. . . . .

I think one of the nicest things you can do to someone you really admire is leave them alone. Just let them go. Let them be. Don’t impose yourself on them because you’re challenging.

. . . . .

“Marriage ends up as a hopeful, generous, infinitely kind gamble taken by two people who don’t know yet who they are or who the other might be, binding themselves to a future they cannot conceive of and have carefully avoided investigating.”

Written by David

May 11th, 2017 at 10:54 pm

Posted in couples

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